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Home > Themes > Bettie Page Tribute

Bettie Page Tribute

Bettie Page was born in Tennessee on April 22, 1923. Enduring a hardscrabble childhood during the Great Depression, Bettie was bright and resourceful, going to college on a scholarship and learning the finer points of hair, makeup, and sewing (skills that would serve her well later in life).

Although her original life's ambition was to be a teacher, Page later tried to become an actress, to limited success. What Bettie couldn't have envisioned is that she would become a legendary pinup model, and a fashion icon whose sense of style and approachable-yet-glamourous look would influence millions of women (and men!), including Dita Von Teese, and artists such as Dave Stevens, Jim Silke, and Terry Moore.

Bettie Page Poses for Her Notorious Photos



After a chance meeting with an amateur photographer at Coney Island, Bettie posed for her first series of photos, building a portfolio that would lead her to photographer Irving Klaw. The series of bondage and S&M photos the two created were sold under the counter in hundreds of shops during the conservative 1950s, and Bettie Page was on her way to becoming the most popular pinup model the world has ever seen.

From 1952 to 1957, Bettie posed for hundreds of photos that have left their mark on pop culture forever. Whether she was laughing on the beach or acting the part of a stern dominatrix, there was something special about Bettie that caught the eye and inspired the imagination. Working with photographers like Bunny Yeager, Jan Caldwell, and H. W. Hannau--and eventually posing for a relatively new publication called Playboy--Page reached the zenith of her initial fame.
Bettie Page Tribute Timeline

Fun Facts About Bettie Page:
  • Bettie was voted "Most Likely to Succeed" in high school
  • She appeared on the small screen in The United States Steel Hour and The Jackie Gleason Show
  • Page made her infamous leopard-printed Jungle Girl outfit.
  • She worked for the Rev. Billy Graham later in life.

The Pinup Retires, but Answers a Higher Calling



After being called to testify for the Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency in 1957, Bettie retired from modeling and eventually moved to Florida. There, she converted to Christianity and dedicated her life to God, acting as a missionary and working for the Reverend Billy Graham. In the ensuing decades, Page endured her own share of troubles and was eventually committed to a psychiatric hospital. However, in the meantime, a curious career resurgence was brewing . . .

Bettie Page Conquers the World!



In the late 1970s and early '80s, interest in Bettie Page reached an all-time high. Comic-book artists were committing her image to paper, her photos were being collected and reprinted as anthologies, and thousands of women were cutting bangs to emulate her instantly recognizable look. It was the beginning of a Bettie Page love-athon that still has yet to wane! Fortunately, Bettie herself was able to enjoy the fruits of her revival before her sad passing in 2008 after suffering a heart attack.

Whether it's her perfectly proportioned figure or her girlish glow, there's something about Bettie Page that still speaks to the artists, photographers, and millions of fans who love her today. Her likeness emblazons collectibles from Zippo lighters to magnets, statues, posters, and comic books. In any case, her fame will likely continue into the next generation and beyond. After all, Bettie Page rules!

Read more about Bettie Page at The Blog From Another World and leave your comments!
Bettie Page Tribute

Bettie Page was born in Tennessee on April 22, 1923. Enduring a hardscrabble childhood during the Great Depression, Bettie was bright and resourceful, going to college on a scholarship and learning the finer points of hair, makeup, and sewing (skills that would serve her well later in life).

Although her original life's ambition was to be a teacher, Page later tried to become an actress, to limited success. What Bettie couldn't have envisioned is that she would become a legendary pinup model, and a fashion icon whose sense of style and approachable-yet-glamourous look would influence millions of women (and men!), including Dita Von Teese, and artists such as Dave Stevens, Jim Silke, and Terry Moore.

Bettie Page Poses for Her Notorious Photos



After a chance meeting with an amateur photographer at Coney Island, Bettie posed for her first series of photos, building a portfolio that would lead her to photographer Irving Klaw. The series of bondage and S&M photos the two created were sold under the counter in hundreds of shops during the conservative 1950s, and Bettie Page was on her way to becoming the most popular pinup model the world has ever seen.

From 1952 to 1957, Bettie posed for hundreds of photos that have left their mark on pop culture forever. Whether she was laughing on the beach or acting the part of a stern dominatrix, there was something special about Bettie that caught the eye and inspired the imagination. Working with photographers like Bunny Yeager, Jan Caldwell, and H. W. Hannau--and eventually posing for a relatively new publication called Playboy--Page reached the zenith of her initial fame.
Bettie Page Tribute Timeline

Fun Facts About Bettie Page:
  • Bettie was voted "Most Likely to Succeed" in high school
  • She appeared on the small screen in The United States Steel Hour and The Jackie Gleason Show
  • Page made her infamous leopard-printed Jungle Girl outfit.
  • She worked for the Rev. Billy Graham later in life.

The Pinup Retires, but Answers a Higher Calling



After being called to testify for the Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency in 1957, Bettie retired from modeling and eventually moved to Florida. There, she converted to Christianity and dedicated her life to God, acting as a missionary and working for the Reverend Billy Graham. In the ensuing decades, Page endured her own share of troubles and was eventually committed to a psychiatric hospital. However, in the meantime, a curious career resurgence was brewing . . .

Bettie Page Conquers the World!



In the late 1970s and early '80s, interest in Bettie Page reached an all-time high. Comic-book artists were committing her image to paper, her photos were being collected and reprinted as anthologies, and thousands of women were cutting bangs to emulate her instantly recognizable look. It was the beginning of a Bettie Page love-athon that still has yet to wane! Fortunately, Bettie herself was able to enjoy the fruits of her revival before her sad passing in 2008 after suffering a heart attack.

Whether it's her perfectly proportioned figure or her girlish glow, there's something about Bettie Page that still speaks to the artists, photographers, and millions of fans who love her today. Her likeness emblazons collectibles from Zippo lighters to magnets, statues, posters, and comic books. In any case, her fame will likely continue into the next generation and beyond. After all, Bettie Page rules!

Read more about Bettie Page at The Blog From Another World and leave your comments!